How Ceramic Creations Come to Life

Carla's ceramics are made from the highest quality materials and are based on the age-old traditions from the Veneto, Umbrian and Tuscan regions. She specializes in the ingobbio, majolica and under-glaze techniques. These techniques along with a process she created, allows her to create abstract as well as traditional designs using bird feathers, cloth, sponges and knives.

All of Carla's pieces are practical as well artistic. The materials she uses in cups, bowls and plates are safe for daily use.

 
Unione
Unione
After the first firing, the colors appear as soft tones.

Unione
Once the piece is cooled down an opaque or high gloss glaze is applied and is fired again.
This makes the piece waterproof and easier to clean.

Ingobbio

Ingobbio pieces starts with Carla creating her own unfired terrracotta object. Once selected, Carla makes the paint for the piece by mixing minerals and oxides with a watered-down white clay base known as ingobbio. The density of the ingobbio is similar to that of olive oil. She applies just enough moisture to each object to ensure that the colors adhere. To enhance color tones, multiple layers of colors are often painted on to the object. This requires extreme precision.
It is essential that the color is accurately mixed and carefully applied to ensure that the color does not become detached from the bisque during the first firing.

 

 

Rinascita
Rinascita
Ingobbio

Under-glaze

 

Most of Carla's under-glaze technique pieces start with fired, pre-made or hand-made one of a kind, white bisque objects. Although terracotta can be used, white bisque renders truer and more vivid colors.

The objects are then painted using the same type of pigments that are used for the majolica and ingobbio techniques. Once objects are painted, each piece is put in a bath of varnish and fired for a second time.

Glazing

A glaze is a vitreous substance, which through the firing process becomes fused to ceramic and porcelain objects, important so that the pieces become strengthened and waterproofed.

Glazes have many characteristics including glossy, matte, textured and color.

Rinascita
Ricordi

They are applied to an object by spraying, dipping, pouring, brushing and sponging. Glazing provides an artist a vast ray of opportunity for creating unique as well as practical works of art.

Carla uses glazes to enhance her designs or a message she intends to communicate, and for her functional-ware pieces, selects glazes that are also safe for food.

Majolica Technique

 

The majolica technique begins with the application of a white glaze base on fired terracotta objects, which can be either hand made or pressed. Once the glaze is dry, the surface becomes very powdery. At this point, the same natural oxides and minerals, which are used in the under-glaze and ingobbio technique, are painted onto the glazed object. The fine-powder glaze base prevents the colors from spreading and blending into each other.

It is a challenging technique due to the fact that the paint must be both precisely and rapidly applied as the colors are quickly absorbed when painted onto the piece. After the objects have been painted, Carla covers them with a transparent glaze which helps better blend the colors. At this point, objects are prepared for a second firing. This technique renders brighter color tones than that of the under-glaze technique.

Mondrian
Mondrian

The majolica technique was introduced into Italy in the 13th century from Moorish Spain. Records show that this technique was first developed in Baghdad in the 9th century.